#234: What Real Friendship Looks Like

It was forty-four years ago today, September 3rd, that one of the greatest adventures of my life began. It was on that date that my family drove me north from southern New England to northeast Vermont to start my college degree program in meteorology. Eventually, that would lead to a very special lifelong friendship, the kind that is rare and special in every way. I introduced you to Bob Gilmore in episode #228 by reading from my 2011 book, The Extra Mile. Today, it’s time for you to get to know Bob by a conversation we had earlier this week.

2 Comments

  1. Rose M. Moore

    This was especially fun, for I too have a “lifer” friend. I met her in first day of first grade 1946 and we’ve remained best friends ever since. But that, of course, (due to her and my age) is too long a story to share here.
    I was also a ham operator. With one of my brothers–closest to my own age–we two were the youngest and only who ever passed ham operator class and morse code as young teenagers. My morse code test was 100 %, and I kept current until a brain aneurysm almost took my life in 1995 just before my 55th birthday. I never regained it; in fact I spent my year-plus of recovery learning to read & write again. My ham radio calling letters were WN8BZQ. Brother Ray & I had to wait til 21 (I think) to remove the NOVICE qualification, and by that time he was in the military (a one-man radio man in a 3-man military truck) and I was a mom, a wife, a newspaper woman etc. As for my lifer friend, we still ARE! In fact, we gathered in August for my 81st birthday. (Never know what I’ll hear on your podcast; I love them all).

  2. Rose M. Moore

    This was especially fun, for I too have a “lifer” friend. I met her in first day of first grade 1946 and we’ve remained best friends ever since. But that, of course, (due to her and my age) is too long a story to share here.
    I was also a ham operator. With one of my brothers–closest to my own age–we two were the youngest and only who ever passed ham operator class and morse code as young teenagers. My morse code test was 100 %, and I kept current until a brain aneurysm almost took my life in 1995 just before my 55th birthday. I never regained it; in fact I spent my year-plus of recovery learning to read & write again. My ham radio calling letters were WN8BZQ. Brother Ray & I had to wait til 21 (I think) to remove the NOVICE qualification, and by that time he was in the military (a one-man radio man in a 3-man military truck) and I was a mom, a wife, a newspaper woman etc. As for my lifer friend, we still ARE! In fact, we gathered in August for my 81st birthday. (Never know what I’ll hear on your podcast; I love them all).

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